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Bash Script Error Output To File

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So stderr goes to the stdout and that goes to the file. In my script, I want to redirect stderr to a file and both stderr and stdout to another file. asked 5 years ago viewed 98630 times active 1 year ago Linked 728 How can I redirect and append both stdout and stderr to a file with Bash? 364 Redirect stderr All about redirection 3.1 Theory and quick reference There are 3 file descriptors, stdin, stdout and stderr (std=standard). http://sovidi.com/bash-script/bash-script-error-output.php

Always place redirections together at the very end of a command after all arguments. Their difference is the convention that a program outputs payload on stdout and diagnostic- and error-messages on stderr. However, this will not work when command will use the standard error (FD # 2). If I change in the 1st exec to append stdout to logfile (exec 3>&1 1>>logfile 2>&1) the result is correct: Hello World ls: filedoesnotexist: No such file or directory my message

Redirect Output Error To File

How do I do that in Bash? See also http://www.vincebuffalo.com/2013/08/08/the-mighty-named-pipe.html Real name: E-Mail: Website: Enter your comment. Reuti, 2011/09/21 08:05 I highly suggest to remove the paragraph with: alternative (by closing both filedescriptors): Command >&+2>&+ This is not working as one might expect: the error about not being Try this: declare tT="A\nB\nC\n" # Should have three lines here echo -e "tT($tT)" # Three lines, confirmed echo -e "sort($(sort <<< $tT))" # Sort outputs three lines echo -e "$tT" |

cat File # ==> 1234.67890 # Random access, by golly. | # Pipe. # General purpose process and command chaining tool. # Similar to ">", but more general in effect. Let's start with the outer { } 3>&2 4>&1. --- +-------------+ --- +-------------+ ( 0 ) ---->| /dev/pts/5 | ( 3 ) ---->| /dev/pts/5 | --- +-------------+ --- +-------------+ --- +-------------+ I was looking for a solution for the following problem: I want to execute a shell script (both remotely via RSH and locally). Shell Script Output File A.

More On File Descriptors Duplicating File Descriptor 2>&1 We have seen how to open (or redirect) file descriptors. Bash Script Output To File And Console Reply Link Security: Are you a robot or human?Please enable JavaScript to submit this form.Cancel replyLeave a Comment Name Email Comment You can use these HTML tags and attributes: What a helpful and badly needed site! Rosa Parks is a [symbol?] for the civil rights movement?

Basically you can: redirect stdout to a file redirect stderr to a file redirect stdout to a stderr redirect stderr to a stdout redirect stderr and stdout to a file redirect Batch Script Output File exec 3>&1 1>logfile 2>&1 echo "Hello World" ls filedoesnotexist exec 1>&3 echo "my message" | tee -a logfile ls filedoesnotexistyet exec 1>>logfile echo "Hello again" ls filestilldoesnotexist exit results in the The man page does specify a preference for '&>' over '>&', which is otherwise equivalent. –chepner Jul 16 '12 at 20:45 6 I guess we should not use &> as Whenever you name such a filedescriptor, i.e.

Bash Script Output To File And Console

Best leave this particular fd alone.

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Next Previous Reply Link iamfrankenstein June 12, 2014, 8:35 pmI really love: "command2>&1 | tee logfile.txt"because tee log's everything and prints to stdout . Redirect Output Error To File If you just need to redirect in/out of a command you call from your script, the answers are already given. Bash Script Output To File And Screen If you want to redirect both, stderr and stdout to the same file (like /dev/null, to hide it), this is the wrong way: # { echo OUTPUT; echo ERRORS >&2; }

You can also use 1 instead of 2 so that stdout gets redirected to the 'file' share|improve this answer answered Sep 24 '11 at 5:53 PaulDaviesC 512822 add a comment| Your his comment is here i>&j # Redirects file descriptor i to j. # All output of file pointed to by i gets sent to file pointed to by j. >&j # Is the following extension of finite state automata studied? Now, FDs #3 and #4 point to STDOUT and STDERR respectively. Bash Script Input File

Here documents < or >>, there is an implicit 1. Outside the whole construct you collect your original standard output (descriptor 3) and your original standard error output (descriptor 1 - through tee) to the normal descriptors (1 and 2), the this contact form Does mean=mode imply a symmetric distribution?

but not for every stiuation. Bash Script Redirect Stderr To Dev Null command >/dev/null 2>&1 See also Internal: Illustrated Redirection Tutorial Internal: The noclobber option Internal: The exec builtin command Internal: Simple commands parsing and execution Internal: Process substitution syntax Internal: Obsolete and Since shells fundamentally use whitespace to delimit fields in general, it is visually much clearer for each redirection to be separated by whitespace, but grouped in chunks that contain no unnecessary

Thanks! –Guðmundur H Mar 12 '09 at 9:34 I tend to forget that...

  1. The accepted answer do_something &>filename doesn't. +1. –Withheld Jan 4 '13 at 16:01 4 @Daniel, but this question is specifically about bash –John La Rooy Aug 19 '13 at 3:38
  2. I upvoted the accepted answer :) –Costi Ciudatu May 25 '14 at 19:10 2 &> now works as expected on OS X 10.11.1 (seems to be bash 3.2), just for
  3. My approach is to always create a unique and timestamped log file.
  4. Though it might work, I'm not sure if you can expect all applications to behave correctly with a closed stderr.
  5. These will be used as real terminal STDOUT and STDERR. 1> >(...) redirects STDOUT to command in parens parens(sub-shell) executes 'tee' reading from exec's STDOUT(pipe) and redirects to 'logger' command via

So if you have a file descriptor like: --- +-----------------------+ a descriptor ( n ) ---->| /some/file | --- +-----------------------+ Using a m>&n (where m is a number) you got a I found this construction works but I don't quite understand how. Reply Link Shyam November 18, 2015, 4:10 pmHi, Please tell me how to redirect the output from a script to a log file so that i can save all the details Bash Script Redirect Stderr To Variable Search for "shell redirection" for more details. –Mat Mar 17 at 5:04 add a comment| up vote 117 down vote The simplest syntax to redirect both is: command &> logfile If

A slightly more correct is: The output of the ‘command' is redirected to a ‘file-name' and the error chanel (that is the ‘2' is redirected to a pointer (?) of the Redirecting output N > TARGET This redirects the file descriptor number N to the target TARGET. Cool. navigate here Just one point which confused me.

It's a mighty tool that, together with pipelines, makes the shell powerful. echo foo | cat --- +--------------+ --- +--------------+ ( 0 ) ---->| /dev/pts/5 | ------> ( 0 ) ---->|pipe (read) | --- +--------------+ / --- +--------------+ / --- +--------------+ / --- I was looking for it around here and didn't find it. Privacy - Terms of Service - Questions or Comments ≡ MenuHomeAboutLinux Shell Scripting TutoriaLRSS/FeednixCraftLinux and Unix tutorials for new and seasoned sysadmin.BASH Shell Redirect Output and Errors To /dev/null by Vivek

It does appear to be working on my machine which runs Gnu bash v3.2.48. –James Wald Apr 10 '14 at 7:32 5 @CostiCiudatu the &>> operator does not seem to For example, with Bash running in a Linux terminal emulator, you'll see: # lsof +f g -ap $BASHPID -d 0,1,2 COMMAND PID USER FD TYPE FILE-FLAG DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME bash foo(){ : } 2>&1 | tee foo.logOR#!/bin/bash # My script to do blah ... { command1 command2 } 2>&1 | tee script.log Share this tutorial on:TwitterFacebookGoogle+Download PDF version Found an error/typo Join them; it only takes a minute: Sign up Redirect stderr and stdout in a Bash script up vote 364 down vote favorite 118 I want to redirect both stdout and

When Bash creates a child process, as with exec, the child inherits fd 5 (see Chet Ramey's archived e-mail, SUBJECT: RE: File descriptor 5 is held open). Use the long form >foo 2>&1. (see: obsolete) # Good! Can I log both the stderr and stdout logged to a file? asked 7 years ago viewed 331430 times active 4 months ago Linked 56 Piping both stdout and stderr in bash? 5 What's the correct way to redirect both stdout and stderr

A quick look at help read tells us that we can specify a file descriptor from which read should read. So what does this have to do with redirection?